More damage than the KGB could ever do (2)

A nation kidnapped

The Mitrokhin revelations may be a convenient political football for India’s ideologically bankrupt political class, but as Amit Varma puts it beautifully in the Asian Wall Street Journal, the real issue is that India has yet to shake off the Soviet hangover that persists to this day.

The strenuous denials of the KGB payouts and the furor (sic) over them repeat the same mistake that the Indian people have made for half a century now – of giving importance to intent over outcome. It makes no earthly difference now whether or not the KGB paid off the establishment in those terrible years. What matters is what the government of the time did, not why it did those things, and the molehill of intent is irrelevant besides the mountain of action. That mountain is in the public domain: the gradual stripping down, layer by layer, of personal and economic freedom. Most of that freedom has still not been restored, and the people of India just don’t seem to care. Even when it affects their own lives so intimately, economics is boring, a spy thriller is much more fun. [India Uncut/IEB]

1 thought on “More damage than the KGB could ever do (2)”

  1. While the socialist economy continues to be noose around Indians economic and social freedoms, the real danger of Indira Gandhi’s and Congress paryt’s, as ruling party, uncategorical sale of India to Soviet was democracy itself. Just within 25 years after kicking out the whites, after nearly century old independence movement, IG and Congress I nearly unraveled India’s independence.

    As briefly explained in this article, http://www.indianexpress.com/full_story.php?content_id=79543, the sole figure standing in between India becoming a Soviet gulag of the type in the eastern (European) block or worst, like the regimes performing murderous experiments of Chinese culture revolution or Cambodia Khmer Rouge, was one man’s fight.

    While it is important to peel away at Indian socialist state, don’t ignore the bigger picture of treacherous road that IG, as prime minister, and Congress party, as ruling party, were on in mid-1970s.

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