Sunday Levity: Buffet style

Pick, choose, enjoy

Dilip D’Souza is so unmoved by “realpolitik” that he has published another post on the topic to register his inertia. His post lightens up the Sunday. It is a must-read post for those who are interested to study the fine art of buffet-debating: just the the bits you like, ignore the bits you don’t, and enjoy your meal.

Dilip selectively quotes from two posts, and one comment, to declare that Realist prescriptions for a policy towards China leave him confused. He could have saved himself the trouble, and the confusion, if only he had looked at what was on the a la carte menu: the old post on One China Policy (there isn’t one) was even re-published in April this year as it was ‘pertinent to the current situation’.

If he had done that, he would not have had to, buffet-style, take some bits and drop others from the paragraphs he decided to quote. (the bits he dropped are in italics)

India’s accumulation of power and influence in Asia will be perceived as a threat by China to the extent that it relatively diminishes Beijing’s own influence. And vice versa. There’s no reason to feel apologetic about this. Aggression and intimidation, like diplomacy and negotiations are parts of a composite toolkit. An offhand rejection of one or more of them is not prudent. [No apologies expected]

India must refrain from going overboard in its support for the Tibetan protests lest this issue upset broader relations with China. But Mr Bhadrakumar defies imagination by holding the Indian government guilty of doing too much already. [John 8:7 does not apply to international relations]

9 thoughts on “Sunday Levity: Buffet style”

  1. As far as I know (I would be glad to be proved wrong), Dilip D’Souza has not had a single original thought since the time he has stepped into this world. He has an affinity for “the good old days of socialism + secularism in India when the water was pure and the sky was blue”. As far as “buffet-debating” is concerned, he regularly pulls out these kind of tricks from his hat. This is neither the first time nor will it be his last.

    Unsolicited advice to Dilip: stick to what you are good at – looking at poverty with pink coolers, shedding tears about how the non-poor are not providing them enough dole and aid, and how all the communal problems in India can be solved if one community can bend itself a bit more. Realpolitik is a bit of a stretch for your bird size brain. Apologies to all the avians in this world!

    Regards,

  2. I was waiting for Acorn’s take on the IAEA draft agreement, and speculation on what China’s next moves will be now that it’s plan seems to be coming unstuck.

  3. The problem with Dilip has always been, and I saying this based on past experiences, that he doesn’t know when he has been beaten fair and square. He just can’t call it quits.

    I half suspect that he will quote this comments after six months to show why he superior to those who indulge in blogging to win battles while all he is interested is in exchange of ideas.

  4. Oops..was half drunk when I wrote the above comment. Read it as,

    The problem with Dilip has always been, and I am saying this based on past experiences, that he doesn’t know when he has been beaten fair and square. He just can’t call it quits.

    I half suspect that he will quote this comment after six months to show why he is superior to those who indulge in blogging to win battles while all he is interested is in exchange of ideas.

  5. Rohit,

    Leaving a comment when you were drunk is understandable. But coming back to look when you were sober…that’s inexplicable.

  6. That is true actually. I am embarrassed. I never function well without a couple of drinks. I need to try Hooch now. Should keep me permanently tipsy..

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