And we’re back

And we’ll pick up from where we dropped off

It’s been a hectic week here: even as we were discussing India’s strategic response to the terrorist attack on Mumbai, our hosting company unilaterally suspended service citing performance problems. More on this later, but we have no reason to believe anyone tried to shut us down. In any case, our traffic load had increased significantly over the last 18 months, and it was time to upgrade to a better service provider.

Other INI blogs will resume their usual routines starting next week (Update: perhaps earlier). Offstumped will be up and covering elections and other political developments.

Meanwhile, the December issue of Pragati is out. You can pick it up from its temporary location at this time.

Pragati - December 2008

Would you subscribe to a print edition of Pragati?

Tell us what you think

We are conducting a survey to find out if we should bring out a print edition of Pragati—The Indian National Interest Review. Seven quick questions and you are done. Proceed to the voting booth»

Note: Subscribers to the digital edition received the survey questionnaire last week. So please do take this survey only if you have not already done so.

Web server woes

We get knocked down, but we’re up again…

The web server on which The Indian National Interest blogs and publications are hosted was down for over 12 hours between August 13th and August 14th. Our current hosting provider informs us that this was due to “one of the hard drives on a shared hosting server (being) corrupted.”

Well, we are up and running now. Life resumes.

Update: Comments have been enabled

It was dull without comments

We are gradually restoring all INI blogs to their normal operations. Comments on The Acorn have been enabled. We’ve switched to a new anti-spam engine too, so please alert us if it eats up your comment by mistake.

Thanks to Srijith Nair, that über geek from Amsterdam, for responding to the SOS last week. On his recommendation, versions were upgraded, caches were created, plugins were deleted, databases were optimised and cryptic log files analysed. The suspicion is that increased traffic caused the web server to use more hosting resources than the web hosting company thinks it should. But then we have not yet begun to use the server to sequence the human genome or model nuclear warheads or suchlike, so it might be that the web hosting company needs to change its thinking, its systems or both.

As one good friend wrote in to say: it was dull without your comments. So comments are up. And they’ll remain so unless something goes wrong again.